• Read THE ICEBERG a beautiful memoir by Marion Coutts, out in hardback
  • Catch Tom Bateman in THE HONOURABLE WOMAN at 9pm on BB2
  • Catch Uriel Emil in THE HONOURABLE WOMAN at 9pm on BB2
  • Read Justin Cartwright's LION HEART, out now in paperback
  • Catch PAXO at the Pleasance London prior to Edinburgh 14 & 15 August
  • See Sue Kelvin as Madam Morrible in WICKED West End
  • Read Harry Sidebottom's IRON AND RUST, out now in hardback
  • Gregory Clarke designs sound for MEDEA at the National Theatre
  • OUTINGS by Thomas Hescott & Matthew Baldwin at Edinburgh Festival
  • Read Chris Bryant's PARLIAMENT: THE BIOGRAPHY, out now in hardback
  • Rhys Jarman designs HOLES at the Arcola Theatre
  • James Perkins designs MOCK TUDOR at the Pleasance (Edinburgh)
  • Gregory Clarke designs sound for MY NIGHT WITH REG at the Donmar
  • Douglas Dunn has won Queen Gold Medal for Poetry 2014
  • Read Michael Simkins' THE RULES OF ACTING, out now in paperback
  • Ellan Parry designs THE NIGHTMARES OF CARLOS FUENTES at Arcola Theatre
  • See DAYTONA in the West End's Haymarket Theatre from 28th June .......
  • James Turner designs THE HACKNEY VOLPONE at Rose Lipman Building
  • Catch Katherine Parkinson in THE HONOURABLE WOMAN at 9pm on BBC2
  • Read Joanna Trollope's BALANCING ACT, out now in hardback
  • Catch Genevieve O'Reilly in THE HONOURABLE WOMAN at 9pm on BBC2
  • Tim Mascall designs INVINCIBLE at the St James Theatre

Client details

Alastair Sooke
© Richard Cook

Alastair Sooke

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Agent
Rosemary Scoular
Assistant: Aoife Rice
+44 (0) 20 3214 0894
About

Alastair Sooke is a British journalist and broadcaster, Art critic of The Daily Telegraph and columnist for BBC.com, the BBC’s international website. He also writes and presents documentaries on television and radio for the BBC and, is the author of two books about art published by Penguin.

Modern Masters, his widely praised series about modern art, was broadcast on BBC One in 2010. The World’s Most Expensive Paintings went out on the same channel the following summer, before BBC Two aired The World’s Most Expensive Stolen Paintings at the end of 2013. After the success of Treasures of Ancient Rome, a three-part series on BBC Four in 2012, a follow-up series, Treasures of Ancient Egypt, was shown at the beginning of 2014. He has also presented Romancing the Stone, a three-part history of British sculpture for BBC Four, and Pride and Prejudice: Having a Ball, a 90-minute BBC Two film marking the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jane Austen’s novel in 1813. Other television documentaries include Unfinished (BBC Two), The Perfect Suit (BBC Four), Whaam! Roy Lichtenstein at Tate Modern (BBC Four), and How the Devil Got His Horns: A Diabolical Tale (BBC Four), which was shortlisted for a 2013 Broadcast Digital Award. He is currently working on Constable: A Country Rebel, a BBC Four documentary about the British painter John Constable.

Since 2009, he has reported regularly for The Culture Show, the BBC’s flagship topical arts television series. As well as contributing more than 40 reports to the series, he has also presented a number of full-length Culture Show programmes about various topics and artists including the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, the Venice Biennale, art during the Second World War, Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings, the Orbit sculpture and observation tower in the Olympic Park, the 150th anniversary of London Underground, the portraitist Jonathan Yeo, and the paper cut-outs of Henri Matisse. His most recent Culture Show Specials, about women Pop artists and Stonehenge, were broadcast on BBC Two in 2014. Several of his programmes have been repeated on BBC World News, which attracts an international audience of 80 million viewers.

As an art critic, Sooke writes extensively but not exclusively about modern and contemporary art. He has reviewed exhibitions at most of Britain’s major museums and galleries, and has covered international festivals such as the Venice Biennale. He has interviewed dozens of artists and photographers, including Marina Abramovic, Anthony Caro, Gilbert & George, Antony Gormley, Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Anselm Kiefer, Jeff Koons, Yoko Ono, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Rachel Whiteread.

Since joining the Telegraph as a trainee in 2003, Sooke has also written widely about theatre and film. He has given talks and chaired events at institutions including the British Museum, the National Portrait Gallery and the V&A, as well as literary and arts festivals around the UK, and has contributed to live programmes on both television and radio. He has written catalogue essays for artists including Jonathan Monk, Rob and Nick Carter, and the late Anthony Caro. In 2013, to accompany a major exhibition at Tate Modern, he wrote a short book about Roy Lichtenstein, which was published by Penguin. Penguin also published his next book, Henri Matisse: A Second Life, in 2014.

Born in 1981, Sooke was educated at Westminster School, where he was a Queen’s Scholar, and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read English language and literature, and won the university’s Charles Oldham Shakespeare Prize. After graduating with a First, he was awarded an MA with distinction by the Courtauld Institute of Art, where he specialised in ancient Greek and Roman art. He currently sits on the Courtauld Association Committee. He lives in London with his wife and daughter.

Bookmark and Share PDF
Agent
Rosemary Scoular
Assistant: Aoife Rice
+44 (0) 20 3214 0894
About

Alastair Sooke is a British journalist and broadcaster, Art critic of The Daily Telegraph and columnist for BBC.com, the BBC’s international website. He also writes and presents documentaries on television and radio for the BBC, and is the author of two books about art published by Penguin.

Modern Masters, his widely praised series about modern art, was broadcast on BBC One in 2010. The World’s Most Expensive Paintings went out on the same channel the following summer, before BBC Two transmitted The World’s Most Expensive Stolen Paintings at the end of 2013. After the success of Treasures of Ancient Rome, a three-part series broadcast on BBC Four in 2012, a follow-up series, Treasures of Ancient Egypt, was shown at the beginning of 2014. He has also presented Romancing the Stone, a three-part history of British sculpture for BBC Four, and Pride and Prejudice: Having a Ball, a 90-minute BBC Two film marking the 200th anniversary of the publication of Jane Austen’s novel in 1813. Other television documentaries include Unfinished (BBC Two), The Perfect Suit (BBC Four), Whaam! Roy Lichtenstein at Tate Modern (BBC Four), and How the Devil Got His Horns: A Diabolical Tale (BBC Four), which was shortlisted for a 2013 Broadcast Digital Award. He is currently working on a documentary for BBC Four about the British painter John Constable.

Since 2009, he has reported regularly for The Culture Show, the BBC’s flagship topical arts television series. As well as contributing more than 40 reports to the series, he has also presented a number of full-length Culture Show programmes about various topics and artists including the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, the Venice Biennale, art during the Second World War, Leonardo da Vinci’s anatomical drawings, the Orbit sculpture and observation tower in the Olympic Park, the 150th anniversary of London Underground, the portraitist Jonathan Yeo, and the paper cut-outs of Henri Matisse. His next Culture Show Specials, about women Pop artists and Stonehenge, will be broadcast on BBC Two in 2014. Several of his programmes have been shown on BBC World News, which attracts an international audience of 80 million viewers.

As an art critic, Sooke writes extensively but not exclusively about modern and contemporary art. He has reviewed exhibitions at most of Britain’s major museums and galleries, and has covered international festivals such as the Venice Biennale. He has interviewed dozens of artists and photographers, including Marina Abramovic, Anthony Caro, Gilbert & George, Antony Gormley, Damien Hirst, Anish Kapoor, Anselm Kiefer, Jeff Koons, Yoko Ono, Ed Ruscha, Richard Serra, Frank Stella, and Rachel Whiteread.

Since joining the Telegraph as a trainee in 2003, Sooke has also written widely about theatre and film. He has given talks and chaired events at institutions such as the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, as well as literary and arts festivals around the UK, and has contributed to live programmes on both television and radio. He has written catalogue essays for artists including Jonathan Monk and Rob and Nick Carter. In 2013, to accompany a major exhibition at Tate Modern, he wrote a short book about Roy Lichtenstein, which was published by Penguin. Penguin will also publish his next book, Henri Matisse: A Second Life, in spring 2014.

Born in 1981, he was educated at Westminster School, where he was a Queen’s Scholar, and Christ Church, Oxford, where he read English language and literature, and won the university’s Charles Oldham Shakespeare Prize. After graduating with a First, he was awarded an MA with distinction by the Courtauld Institute of Art, where he specialised in ancient Greek and Roman art. He currently sits on the Courtauld Association Committee. He lives in London with his wife and daughter.

 

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